Tag Archives: Type 2

HEART DISEASE IS IMPROVED WHEN DIABETICS EAT VEGETABLES…

HEART DISEASE IS IMPROVED WHEN DIABETICS EAT VEGETABLES…
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 21-7-2016

Fresh Vegetables, Fruits and other foodstuffs. Shot in a studio.Over a period of 12 months, Australian researchers tested the effects of fruits and vegetables on a group of people who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and hardening of the arteries in the carotid intima-media thickness. They divided the diabetics into two groups…

Group 1 consumed their regular diet, and
Group 2 were invited to add one serving of fruit and two servings of vegetables to their regular meal plan.

Now first, you should know adding one serving of fruit and two servings of vegetables is not adding a whole lot of nutritious fruits and vegetables to your eating plan. The Japanese, who eat the most fruits and vegetables of any culture, eat about seventeen servings each and every day.

Nevertheless, the inside of the carotid artery improved significantly with only three servings.

Could you eat an extra three servings of fruits and vegetables each day? What about adding an apple or a cup of blueberries and a quart bowl filled with 1 cup spinach, ½ cup kale, and ½ cup Romaine lettuce? You could add a little dressing on top for flavor.

What can you do to get in more vegetables? If you don’t want to eat more vegetables, could you take vegetable capsules? Three capsules taken twice daily provides 17 servings of them easily. There are different ways to raise your intake of vegetables and fruits.

Source: Petersen, K.S., et al. Effect of improving dietary quality on carotid intima-media thickness in subjects with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a 12-mo randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 2015 Sep 9. Epub ahead of print.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

 

 

WHICH FOODS CONTAIN HIDDEN SUGARS?

WHICH FOODS CONTAIN HIDDEN SUGARS?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 7-10-2015
Unhealthy eating concept...

The unhealthy eating concept…

Some foods on the market should not even be called foods because they are a mock-up. Many foods present with artificial preservatives, chemicals and added sugars and are far, far away from what a natural food looks like or tastes.

Your mission is to detect these artificial foods and the fake sugars they contain – and stay as far away from them as possible.

For example, imitation sugar #1 is corn syrup. High fructose corn syrup is a highly processed chemical added to foods. It has already been revealed in many research studies to cause metabolic disorder, pre-diabetes, worsen Type 2 diabetes, and help bring about many adverse effects in the body.

Let’s make this article interactive – go to your kitchen cabinet to start checking foods for corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup. It is surprising to find the number of foods with these products in them. Next look for sugar words in the list of ingredients…

– invert sugar,
– turbinado sugar,
– maple sugar,
– brown sugar,
– molasses,
– syrups,
– honey, and
– agave.

It is a real shocker to find foods in your cabinet containing these ingredients. Then look for sucrose and fructose. Next look for fake sugars along these lines…

– aspartamine,
– aspartame,
– saccharine,
– xylitol,
– sorbitol,
– erythritol,
– sucralose, and
– mannitol.

Energy Drink CanMake sure you check foods such as condiments – ketchup, mustard, teriyaki sauce, barbecue sauce, and hot sauce. Don’t forget to check tomato and pasta sauces, dried fruit, soda, gummies, granola bars, canned fruit and any energy drinks.

 Check your cabinets and let us know what you find! Find out more in our next blog – we’ll discuss the topic, “Why Should I Remove High Fructose Corn Syrup From My Diet?”

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

Why Does My Dietitian and Doctor Tell Me Sugar is Okay for Diabetics?

Why Does My Dietitian and Doctor Tell Me Sugar is Okay for Diabetics?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 17-8-2015

The simple answer to this question is that your dietitian and doctor are misinformed. Your dietitian gets information from the American Dietetic Association. Your doctor gets information from the American Medical Association.

Morning breakfast with mini donuts and berriesBoth your dietitian and your medical doctor have to operate within the standards of their profession. Thus, if their professional standards tell them to not remove sugar from the diet of diabetics, then they technically have to follow the standards.

Both the American Medical Association and the American Dietetic Association don’t recommend removing sugar from the diet. There’s some talk about the American Dietetic Association receiving kickbacks from the sugar industry for promoting it, and this talk goes back a few decades.

There’s a move in today’s medical schools towards something called translational medicine. Have you heard of it?

This is where the professors at the medical school are not waiting 25 years anymore for the American Medical Association to get around to changing their policies about different types of therapies. Instead, they’re collecting the data from numerous recently done medical studies and starting to incorporate them in their practice now.

And these physicians are a lot more successful than the conservative ones who decide to wait until they are told what to do and what to change in their practice.

You can do the same thing. By using this information on our blog, which is highly researched to find out what works for diabetics, you can take your diabetes and then eliminate it. This latest series on sugar is one of the first steps.

Next…  find out how you can get your family to stop eating so much sugar in their diet.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

IT’S DIABETIC QUIZ TIME… HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE GLYCEMIC INDEX?

IT’S DIABETIC QUIZ TIME… HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE GLYCEMIC INDEX?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 16-6-2015

glycemic indexQuizzes are fun and here are several questions about the Glycemic Index. Knowing these answers is important because it can help you regulate your own blood sugar levels. Doing what you can to keep your blood sugar levels closer to normal via diet is possible, and knowing how to avoid High Glycemic Index foods is a big part of it.

1. The Glycemic Index is a scale from 0 to 100 that measures carbohydrate foods. True or False?

2. Fats can also be given a Glycemic Index. True or False?

3. Protein foods may also be given a Glycemic Index. True or False?

4. Dairy products are protein foods and carbohydrate foods; therefore, they have a Glycemic Index.
True or False?

5. Nuts are protein foods so they don’t have a Glycemic Index. True or False?

6. The fruits with a low Glycemic Index include cherries, grapefruit, and apples. True or False?

7. The vegetables that could have a higher glycemic index are ones that are starchy vegetables such as corn and potatoes. True or False?

8. The high fiber grains are healthy for you and have a low-Glycemic Index. True or False?

9. If a food is organic, it will have a lower Glycemic Index than a non-organic food. True or False?

ANSWERS…

1. True.
2. False. The Glycemic Index only measures carbohydrate foods; however, if a nut also contains carbohydrates, it will have a Glycemic Index.
3. True. Protein foods such as animal meats, poultry and fish do not have a Glycemic Index because they are protein and fat with no carbohydrates. However, any protein food that may also contain carbs has a Glycemic Index.
4. True.
5. False. Nuts are fat foods and the Glycemic Index only refers to carbohydrates, not fats. Nuts do contain a little protein, but it is not much. Nuts such as peanuts and cashews contain a little carbohydrate; thus these nuts will have a Glycemic Index.
6. True.
7. True.
8. False. Just because a food is high fiber does not mean it has a safe Glycemic Index.
9. False. The organic part of a food has nothing to do with its Glycemic Index.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

 

JOHN HOPKINS UNIVERSITY DECOMPRESSION METHODS HELP DIABETICS

JOHN HOPKINS UNIVERSITY DECOMPRESSION METHODS HELP DIABETICS
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 27-4-2015

BHP.LEGS>03D30908A few decades ago, doctors and scientists thought diabetics were more susceptible to develop compression of the nerves that became chronic. That’s because diabetics who have diabetic neuropathy have a lot of pain and can’t feel where their feet are in space. For example, it’s difficult to feel how much someone is pressing down on the gas pedal when they have diabetic neuropathy. Sometimes the diabetics with this condition have to walk as if they are dragging their leg.

If this belief is true, then when diabetics have neuropathy, then it’s possible by using decompression techniques, they would have the ability to feel their limbs again and have a lot less pain.

They did some studies at Johns Hopkins University on a method called Dellon Triple Decompression surgery and found with this technique, the diabetics showed significantly decreased ulceration and amputation. They also found there were fewer admissions to hospitals for chronic foot infections. There was also a decrease in pain and an increase in feeling of the limbs.

This shows us in diabetic neuropathy, there is a very positive effect that could be expected when you decompress the nerves affected by the neuropathy. Unfortunately the method tested was only a surgical technique and we don’t know what types of natural decompression methods are available. Chiropractors use a technique called spinal decompression that is not surgical, but helps decompress the nerves in the spine and the sciatic nerve.

Will the chiropractic decompression method help? You won’t know until you give it a try. Call your local chiropractor and ask him if he has a decompression table he uses in his practice.

Source: Dellon, A.L. Susceptibility of Nerve in Diabetes to Compression: Implications for Pain Treatment. Plast Reconstr Surg 2014 Oct; 134(4S-2 Current Concepts in Pain Management in Plastic Surgery): 142S-150S

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

CHEESY “SPAGHETTI” AND TUNA

CHEESY “SPAGHETTI” AND TUNA
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 13-3-2015

Craving a cheesy meal to comfort you? If so, you likely already know that opening up a box of conventional macaroni and cheese is simply not a good option as far as your diabetic eating plan is concerned.

High in carbs, loaded with fat, and containing very little protein, it simply isn’t going to do your body well.

Zucchini noodles with tomatoes and pesto with egg on top

Zucchini noodles with tomatoes and pesto with egg on top

Fortunately, there is a solution. This made over recipe that includes tuna and a lower carb noodle will fit the bill perfectly. While it may not taste exactly like the real thing, it’ll be close enough for you to find your craving satisfied…

Ingredients

2 cups zucchini noodles

½ tbsp. olive oil

1 can of tuna

½ cup unflavored unsweetened almond milk

¼ cup unflavored pea protein powder

¼ cup low fat grated cheddar cheese

1 tbsp. coconut flour

1 clove freshly diced garlic

1/8 cup freshly chopped parsley

½ cup peas

Prepare zucchini noodles by using a regular potato peeler to make noodles, or a Veggetti Spiral Vegetable Slicer.”  Once made, set aside.

In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the olive oil and garlic. To this, add the zucchini noodles and cook for 2 to 3 minutes.

Meanwhile, in another pot, combine the almond milk, pea protein powder, cheddar cheese, and coconut flour. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir for about  2 to 3 minutes.

Add the peas and zucchini noodles into the pot, stir, and then top with parsley. Serve immediately.

This recipe will offer far fewer carbs than the traditional macaroni and cheese recipe, provide much more protein, and also give you a good dose of calcium as well. Feel free to swap out the tuna for another protein source if desired (pre-cooked chicken or turkey will both work great), as well as add any other vegetables as desired (chopped carrots, tomatoes, or peppers).

Serve it as a quick lunch or dinner any time you want some comfort food.

Enjoy!

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

5 Things That Ensure Your Next Generation Will Have Type 2 Diabetes

5 Things That Ensure Your Next Generation Will Have Type 2 Diabetes
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 29-10-2014

Beautiful Happy FamilyDoctors at the Keck School of Medicine did some serious investigating into why certain Hispanic families had more diabetes in their generations and discovered some pretty interesting findings…

1. Meal preparation and eating are two activities shared within families, and a child could be taught how to develop diabetes from the eating patterns.

2. Participating in activities that others in the family are doing contributes to passing along diabetes.

3. Family members shape expectations for the future with understandings of diabetes.

4. Family members can have good intentions when they act in certain ways but the actions could still have negative consequences.

5. Children and parents could support each other’s diabetes care.

The researchers found knowledge, attitudes, and self-care practices related to diabetes are strongly influenced by how well family members with diabetes manage the disorder. When they depart from current standards of diabetes care, that sends a strong message to the children.

They concluded that care providers should consider that there is going to be a significant influence from family members – it may be positive or it may be negative – on the self-care practices of the children.

Really no surprise here. Who you’re around most is going to influence you the most. What you see in your environment shapes who you are.

Source: Pyatak, E.A., et al. “We are All Gonna Get Diabetic These Days.” The Impact of a Living Legacy of Type 2 Diabetes on Hispanic Young Adults’ Diabetes Care. Diabetes Education 2014 May 27. Epub ahead of print.

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

New Test to Replace the Hemoglobin A1c Test?

New Test to Replace the Hemoglobin A1c Test?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 10-10-2014

The Hemoglobin A1c test measures blood sugar control over the last three months. It’s a sure way for health professionals to verify whether or not a diabetic is lying about what he or she has been eating.

Is there a new test to replace the HbA1c test?

Is there a new test to replace the HbA1c test?

Well now, the Hemoglobin A1c test may have to take a back seat to the new serum glycated albumin (GA) test. This test measures a shorter time frame and may be more useful.

It doesn’t mean the doctors still won’t measure the Hemoglobin A1c test. Actually, they’ll still need it because by looking at the ratio of GA to Hemoglobin A1c, the doctors may be able to correlate the pancreas ability to secrete insulin and also tell how much fluctuation in blood sugar occurred.

At two medical schools in Korea, doctors tested 42 volunteers with diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, looking for these relationships.

They found the ratio of GA to Hemoglobin A1c was significantly higher in Type 1 diabetics than Type 2 diabetics. The same ratio was correlated with the fasting plasma glucose.  They concluded that GA is a better test than fasting plasma glucose levels and the GA/Hemoglobin A1c ratio could predict insulin secretory function.

One more thing you should know – so far this has only been tested by these Researchers in children who are diabetics, not adults.

Just when you finally get the whole lab tests for diabetes down cold, the profession wants to change it! You already know you should always have a fasting blood glucose done when you go to the doctor, as well as a hemoglobin A1c, and an insulin level. Now they’re proposing the addition of glycated albumin.

Something to think about but don’t lose sleep about it!

Source: Lee, J.W., et al. Serum glycated albumin as a new Glycemic control for pediatric diabetes. Ann Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2014 Dec; 18(4): 203-13.

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

3 Tips To Remember Before Doing Sprint Training…

3 Tips To Remember Before Doing Sprint Training…
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 8-10-2014

Sport - Runner. Man running with concentration, determination anIf you’ve been working out a while and are reading more information on what type of exercise is best suited to help you achieve optimal progress with your workout routine, you have likely read that sprint training is going to be most ideal when it comes to burning fat, increasing your fitness, and moving forward.

But, before you jump onto the bandwagon, there are some important points you should know to help ensure you go about adding this exercise safely. If you do it incorrectly, you could quickly find yourself injured and not exercising at all.

Clearly that isn’t what you want, so take some safety tips to ensure it doesn’t happen to you.

Here’s what to know…

1. Start Slowly. First, make sure you start your sprint training slowly. Don’t go out and then do 10 sprint intervals right off the bat. Doing so is a very fast way to set yourself up for injury.

Instead, start with 3 to 4 and build up from there. Do it in conjunction with your usual cardio training if you have to at first.

2. Use Longer Intervals At The Beginning. Next, also consider using longer interval when you are just starting sprint training. Rather than using 20 second intervals which would be very, very intense due to their ultra-short duration, try 60 second intervals. These will call more upon your endurance skill but won’t be done at quite as fast of a pace.

When it comes to injury risk, the faster the pace, the higher the risk so this can safeguard you when you first start.

3. Be Mindful Of Your Warm-Up. Finally, also be sure you are being very mindful of your warm-up protocol. If you are not warming up fully, you are going to be putting yourself at risk. It’s that simple.

Remember you will need to do a longer warm-up for sprint training than you would a regular cardio session again due to the intensity demands being placed on the body.

So keep these quick tips in mind and always make sure that you are preparing yourself fully when you begin sprint training. If you start off on the wrong foot, you may not enjoy sprint training at all and this could lead you to forgo doing this exercise again.

It is beneficial, so start of properly so that you can include it in your routine for years to come.

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

Tips For Better Progress Pictures

Tips For Better Progress Pictures
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 25-9-2014

As you embark on your own weight loss journey I highly recommend taking progress pictures…

If you are looking to give yourself a motivational boost as you begin your fitness journey, taking some progress pictures is a very wise move. It’s hard at times to see day-to-day changes occurring in your body, however, when you look at yourself over a longer period of time – two to four weeks for instance, it becomes quite clear very quickly just how much progress you are making.

Hooray - I've just reached my goal weight picture...

Hooray – I’ve just reached my goal weight picture…

This said, you need to know how to take progress pictures as best as possible to ensure you are seeing the changes that are occurring.

Poor pictures can be misleading and therefore crush your motivation. Let’s walk you through three quick tips to remember for superior progress pictures…

Wear The Same Clothing – And Minimal Clothing At That. First, it’s going to be important you take them with the same clothing on each time you do. This is going to help to ensure you are always maintaining the same overall image and you aren’t wearing something that is hiding the progress you make.

In addition, you should be aiming to wear as little clothing as possible. This is going to really go a long way towards showing you the full picture of the progress you are making.

Don’t be shy – you are the only one who has to see these.

Take Them At The Same Time Each Week. Next, it’s also vital you take them at the same time each week. If you are taking them in the morning at times and in the afternoon other times, this is going to sway progress.

For optimal results, take them first thing in the morning before you’ve eaten or had anything to drink. Food and liquids will influence the way you look so you don’t want this to be a factor.

Note Any External Factors That Could Be At Play. Finally, you’ll also want to note any external factors that could be at play. Did you have a spicy meal the night before? For women, is your menstrual cycle coming up?

Remember there is always going to be a normal fluctuation in your body weight due to these, so try and jot them down as best as possible to give the full picture.

By keeping these quick tips in mind, you can make sure your progress pictures are going to be as beneficial as possible.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva