Tag Archives: fruit

HEART DISEASE IS IMPROVED WHEN DIABETICS EAT VEGETABLES…

HEART DISEASE IS IMPROVED WHEN DIABETICS EAT VEGETABLES…
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 21-7-2016

Fresh Vegetables, Fruits and other foodstuffs. Shot in a studio.Over a period of 12 months, Australian researchers tested the effects of fruits and vegetables on a group of people who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and hardening of the arteries in the carotid intima-media thickness. They divided the diabetics into two groups…

Group 1 consumed their regular diet, and
Group 2 were invited to add one serving of fruit and two servings of vegetables to their regular meal plan.

Now first, you should know adding one serving of fruit and two servings of vegetables is not adding a whole lot of nutritious fruits and vegetables to your eating plan. The Japanese, who eat the most fruits and vegetables of any culture, eat about seventeen servings each and every day.

Nevertheless, the inside of the carotid artery improved significantly with only three servings.

Could you eat an extra three servings of fruits and vegetables each day? What about adding an apple or a cup of blueberries and a quart bowl filled with 1 cup spinach, ½ cup kale, and ½ cup Romaine lettuce? You could add a little dressing on top for flavor.

What can you do to get in more vegetables? If you don’t want to eat more vegetables, could you take vegetable capsules? Three capsules taken twice daily provides 17 servings of them easily. There are different ways to raise your intake of vegetables and fruits.

Source: Petersen, K.S., et al. Effect of improving dietary quality on carotid intima-media thickness in subjects with type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a 12-mo randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 2015 Sep 9. Epub ahead of print.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

 

 

Is Agave Syrup just Table Sugar in Disguise?

Is Agave Syrup just Table Sugar in Disguise?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 14-12-2013

healthy food.Your body can’t avoid consuming some sugars. In fact you need carbohydrates and certain sugars for your very survival because your cells break these down and turn glucose into energy for you. Sugars are a natural part of many of the foods you eat, including fruits and vegetables. Sugars found in processed foods or that you add to your foods are another matter, however. Some are relatively healthy, and others are not so good for you.

Alternative sweeteners to sugar are becoming a common place in supermarkets all around the world. But one that is given a highly regarded reputation, even in natural and organic health stores, is the famous Agave Syrup. But labeling it as a “healthy alternative” to sugar is proving to be a mistake.

What is Agave Syrup? Agave syrup is taken from the blue agave plant, of which there are 300 types of agave plants that typically grow in Mexico, the southern United States and in northern South America.

Traditionally it was used by the Aztec people for healing infections and wounds from the raw plant itself.

Today’s version is quite different. What is typically being sold on the market now is a form that started out as a natural substance from Mother Nature, but after heavy processing and refining the end result is completely different and not so natural after having some of the vital nutrients and components removed. Unfortunately there are many reports that several brands are heated and refined and manufacturers are not designating this on the label. So, you think the product is pure and unprocessed but in fact the product may be be heated to high temperatures for long periods of time. Even more disturbing is the ingredient data shows it contains a lot of fructose.

Is Agave Syrup healthy? The facts are refined and processed agave sweeteners are not really any healthier than sugar and its famous friends – honey, high fructose corn syrup or other sweeteners. Nutritionally speaking, agave syrup acts in the body in the same way high fructose corn syrup and sugar syrup do – which as we know can cause everyone’s blood sugar to rise drastically especially if consumed often.

To be specific, agave syrup can range from 55% to 90% concentrated fructose, (which is a simple sugar that is found in fruit), the other 10% is glucose.

So for a person diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, agave syrup really isn’t any better for them than the other sugar substitutes – or even pure table sugar for that matter seeing as it has the same effect on the body as the others, and that’s what counts.

It should also be noted agave syrup is not safe for consumption during pregnancy due to the large amount of saponins agave syrup contains. The saponins have a possible link to miscarriage by stimulating blood flow to the uterus. So agave syrup is best avoided when pregnant.

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Follow me on… Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

 

 

Why Fiber is Vital in Helping to Self-manage Type 2 Diabetes…

Why Fiber is Vital in Helping to Self-manage Type 2 Diabetes…
Posted by admin, Dated 25-11-2013

bhp.girl.appleFiber is naturally found in all foods except animal protein and dairy products.

There are two types of fiber – soluble and insoluble. Both types provide health benefits and both types can be found in most plant based foods.

Fiber-rich foods vital in preventing blood sugar levels soaring…

Modern day processing of foods rich in fiber often ends up reducing levels – or removing the fiber completely. Examples of food with the fiber removed completely are white rice and white pasta. Fiber is commonly known for keeping the digestive tract healthy – and fiber-rich foods, especially soluble fiber rich foods, can play a part in keeping blood sugar levels within a normal healthy range for people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This is because the soluble type fiber is indigestible.

So this type of fiber ends up absorbing water in the gut instead of being broken down like insoluble fiber and acts to slow the rate of digestion. When digestion is slowed, food cannot be digested fast and blood sugar levels cannot rise quickly either… as the energy from the foods, glucose, is released into the blood stream at a slower rate also. Whereas the insoluble fiber plays a role in ensuring the digestion process does not take too long, helping to avoid constipation and ensuring your body receives the nutrients it needs from the foods it is digesting sooner rather than later.

Low-fiber foods should be avoided by everyone but especially people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes…

When preparing meals the following suggestions could prove to be useful guides:
– if you can eat fruits, stick to fruits with a low-GI and eat them in their whole form, i.e. an apple from the store will be kinder to your blood sugar levels than processed apple juice that will have had the fiber removed

– when cooking vegetables, leave the skin as the fiber in the skin will help to stop your blood sugar rising too high

– avoid all white foods… white bread, white pasta, white rice and so on, and stick to wholegrain (and some brown) varieties.

This information is only one part of the Type 2 diabetes diet puzzle – but plays a crucial part in educating and empowering you to be able to have more control over this disease and can help to stop your blood sugar levels rising. Simply because if the fiber component is missing from your food, blood sugar is allowed to rise much more quickly than it would if fiber was still there. Guess this is nature looking out for us!

This is also vital to be put into practice by everyone not just those living with Type 2 diabetes.

Why Fibre is Vital in Helping to Self-manage Type 2 Diabetes

Why Fibre is Vital in Helping to Self-manage Type 2 Diabetes
Posted by admin, Dated 25-9-2013

Fiber is naturally found in all foods except animal protein (meat and fish), and dairy products.

bhp.vegetables buyingThere are two types of fiber; soluble and insoluble. Both types of fiber provide health benefits and both types can be found in most plant based foods.

Fiber rich foods vital in stopping blood sugar levels soaring:

Modern day processing of foods rich in fiber often ends up reducing levels, or removing the fiber completely. Examples of food items with the fiber removed completely are white rice and white pasta. Fiber is commonly known for keeping the digestive tract healthy. But fiber rich foods, especially soluble fiber rich foods, can play a part in keeping blood sugar levels within a normal healthy range for people with Type 2 diabetes.

This is because the soluble type fiber is quite indigestible. So this type of fiber ends up absorbing water in the gut instead of being broken down like insoluble fiber, and acts to slow down the rate of digestion. When digestion is slowed down, food cannot be digested too quickly and therefore blood sugar levels cannot rise too quickly either as the energy from the foods (glucose) is released into the blood stream at a slower rate too. Whereas the insoluble fiber plays a role in ensuring the digestion process does not take too long, helping to avoid constipation and ensuring your body gets the nutrients it needs from the foods it is digesting sooner rather than later.

Foods low in fiber must be avoided by everyone; especially people with Type 2 diabetes.

When preparing meals the following suggestions could prove as useful guides:

• if you can eat fruits, stick to fruits with a low GI (Glycaemic Index) and eat them in their whole form only, i.e. an apple from the store will be kinder to your blood sugar levels than processed apple juice that will have had the fiber removed

• when cooking vegetables, leave the skin on, as the fiber in the skin will help to stop your blood sugar rising too high

• avoid all “white foods” – white bread, white pasta, white rice and so on, and stick to wholegrain (and some brown) varieties

This information is only really one part of the Type 2 diabetes diet puzzle, but plays a crucial part in educating and empowering you to be able to have more control over this disease and can help to stop your blood sugar levels rising too high. Simply because the fiber component is missing from our food, blood sugar is allowed to rise quicker than it would if the fiber was still there, (guess this is nature looking out for us!), and this is vital to be put into practice by all people, and not just those living with Type 2 diabetes.

Going Out to Brunch? What to Eat…

Going Out to Brunch? What to Eat…
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 20-11-2012

Maybe you’re out traveling and you come across some of the common hotel brunches on the weekend. Maybe you’re in your home town and you want to do something special. Going out to brunch is first on your list.

When you get there, what will you eat?

You know you want to eat safely on your diabetic diet but with all the foods to choose, where do you start?

The answer is with the protein foods. Always start by putting protein foods on your plate. This includes chicken, fish, turkey, beef, lamb or pork. Choose one to two small portions of each of these and add them to your plate.

Next go for the vegetables. This means the non-starchy vegetables. Fill up half your plate with non-starchy vegetables.

Next determine whether or not you are going to eat a dessert. If you decide to add a dessert, put it in a separate bowl for dessert – and only take ½ of the normal serving size.

Next add one serving of fruit. You need your fruit serving for antioxidants.

And now, count how many servings of carbohydrate starchy food you have taken. If the number of servings is less than 2, then you can add ½ of a bread serving, such as ½ piece cornbread or ½ home baked bread slice or roll.

And then add your beverage – water or coffee or tea is best. No soft drinks! These will leach calcium from your bones!

And that’s it. You’re set. You won’t need anything else to fill you up. Your goal is to be filled, not gorged.

And that’s how you keep your blood sugar in control.

What Should a Diabetic Eat?

What Should a Diabetic Eat?
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 9-3-2012

Receiving a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes is a shock for most people. But why not think of it as a disease that gives you the opportunity to look at your lifestyle, change it, and then reverse your condition? No matter how severe your condition is when it is diagnosed, it is one of the very few conditions where you, the person with Type 2 diabetes, can achieve great health.

It’s really not a secret, it’s the food on your plate. One of the most important keys to Type 2 diabetes control and reversal is first to know what foods will harm you most. Then stop letting them harm you!

Here’s how to change your diet, one step at a time:

1. Replace the diet drinks with water and herb teas such as peppermint, chamomile, green tea, chair tea, or rose hip teas.

2. Cut down how much coffee you drink daily: stick to one cup per day.

3. Begin eating a quart bowl of non-starchy vegetables every day. This bowl can contain:

broccoli, cauliflower,
asparagus, cabbage, carrots,
lettuce, kale, spinach,
onions, garlic, leeks,
ginger, celery,
green peppers, hot peppers,
zucchini, and
other non-starchy vegetables.

4. Switch from white rice to brown rice.

5. Switch from white bread to sprouted breads with whole grains or whole grain breads with less than 17 grams carbohydrate per slice.

6. Switch vegetable and corn or safflower oil to olive oil.

7. Throw out the margarine and fake butters and replace with unsalted butter.

8. Replace the breaded meat and fish products with the real cuts of meat and fish.

9. Change your snacks to raw almonds, walnuts, peanuts, which are unsalted.

10. Limit whole grains to 2 to 3 servings per day unless you are a male 5’9″ (175.3 cm) or taller, (3 to 4 servings for tall people).

11. Eat fruits in serving sizes only.

12. Go through the packaged foods in your cabinet. If you can’t eat one serving of that food at a time, throw it out.

13. Go through the packaged foods in your cabinet again. Eliminate the foods that have more than 30 grams carbohydrate in one serving.

14. Go through the packaged foods in your cabinet once more. Eliminate the foods that have more than 300 mg sodium per serving.

As a Type 2 diabetic, you have to make a decision. Do you want to continue consuming foods that are harming you and causing all your health problems, little by little, with every meal? The bad reactions to these foods is happening even though you may not feel them occurring.

About The Breakdown of Drugs and Citrus Fruits!

About The Breakdown of Drugs and Citrus Fruits!
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 13-9-2010

First of all, it’s important to know there are some prescription medications that can cause harmful reactions if you eat a grapefruit at the same time a medication is taken. And doctors even recommend that you simply don’t eat grapefruit… and pomelos and Seville oranges at all, just in case the medication interferes with the fruit at a later time during the day after eating it. Medication stays in your system for eight or more hours in most cases, which is why it reacts later in the day.

Here is a short list of drugs that interfere with the consumption of grapefruit:

  • Zoloft
  • BuSpar
  • Carbatrol
  • Tegretol
  • Neoral
  • Sandimmune
  • Prograf
  • Zocor
  • Mevacor
  • Lipitor
  • Nimotop
  • Sular
  • Procardia
  • Saquinavir

What was mentioned here is that the drugs interfere with grapefruit consumption? Not that grapefruit interferes with the drugs.

Yes, that is right!

Why should we believe that it’s more important to have a drug in our system than a fruit? The reality is that the medication is a foreign substance, one that God did not create. And although it may be used to alter the body that has a disease, that medication is still a medication and it should always be treated as something abnormal in the body… when looking at it from an alternative healing perspective. So in this regard, it’s not the grapefruit that is the problem; it’s the medication!

You may be wondering what is it that causes the interaction between the fruit and the medication. The answer is that enzymes in the fruit metabolize the drug too fast and can cause higher than normal levels of the drug in your bloodstream. This would result in the potential for serious side effects.

So check your medications right now and make sure that you know whether or not your prescription drugs will prevent you from eating these healthy citrus fruits.

Does The Insulin Index Diet Really Work to Help Diabetics Lose Weight?

Does The Insulin Index Diet Really Work to Help Diabetics Lose Weight?
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 9-3-2010

Have you been looking at the Insulin Index Diet site, if so, you may have noticed several articles pointing out the hormone insulin does not just transport sugar, it also transports fat. In fact, insulin is about 300 times more efficient at taking free fatty acids out of your bloodstream than it is at taking out sugar! Because diabetics require more insulin to remove sugar from their bloodstream than non-diabetics, they tend to gain weight. Being fat doesn’t make you diabetic. Being diabetic makes you fat!

But the Insulin Index Diet can help you lose weight a little more easily than most other approaches. You won’t read about this diet in any book … because it works quite well and you won’t need to buy any special products, attend meetings, or go on another diet a year later.

Here are the basics:

More about what you eat than how much you eat. The Insulin Index Diet is more about what you eat than how much you eat. The idea behind this diet is that certain foods trigger greater release of insulin than others. The more insulin released after eating a particular food, the more completely fatty acids are going to be cleared out of your bloodstream. All other things being equal, you lose more weight when you can keep your insulin levels low.

Which foods trigger high release of insulin? Courtesy of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and researchers Suzanne H. A. Holt, Jenni Brand-Miller, and Peter Petrocz of the University of Sydney (Australia), here is a ranking of how much insulin is secreted in response to a 240 calorie (1000kJ) portion of each food. The higher the number, the more insulin release it triggers.

Breakfast Cereals (served with low-fat milk):

  • All-Bran™ 4299
  • Porridge (raw rolled oats, microwaved) 5093
  • Natural muesli (raw rolled oats, dried fruits, nuts) 6034
  • Special K™ 8038
  • Cornflakes™ 8768
  • Sustain™ 8938
  • Honeysmacks™ 9102

Carbohydrate-rich Foods:

  • White Pasta 4455
  • Brown Pasta 4535
  • Brown Rice (boiled) 6240
  • Rye Bread 6659
  • French Fries (McCain’s oven fries) 7643
  • White Rice (boiled) 8143
  • Wholemeal Bread 11203
  •  White Bread 12882
  • Russet Potatoes (boiled and peeled) 13930

High-Protein Foods:

  • Eggs (poached) 4744
  • Cheddar Cheese 5994
  • Beef Fillets (trimmed of visible fat and grilled) 7910
  • Lentils (served in tomato sauce) 9268
  • Ling Fish (steamed) 9350
  • Baked Beans (heated canned beans) 20106

Fruit:

  • Apples 8919
  • Oranges 9345
  • Grapes 12293
  • Bananas 12445

Snacks and Candies:

  • Peanuts 3047
  • Popcorn (microwaved) 6537
  • Potato Chips 8195
  • Ice Cream 12348
  • Yogurt 15611
  • Mars Bar™ 16682
  • Jellybeans 22860

Bakery Goods:

  • Doughnuts with cinnamon sugar 12445
  • Croissants 13097
  • Iced Chocolate Cake 14305
  • Water crackers 14673
  • Cookies (chocolate chip) 15223

The idea here is the foods that cause the lowest secretion of insulin are the foods that are least likely to cause the accumulation of body fat. Calorie for calorie, foods with the highest insulin score are the most likely to cause weight gain. The foods with the lowest insulin score are the least likely to cause weight gain.

The effect of these foods on weight gain is independent of their effect on blood sugar. If you are in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, your pancreas can still produce enough insulin eventually, to clear glucose out of your bloodstream. These numbers indicate how much insulin the pancreas will produce, and how much fat will be stored in the process.

Protein is not always beneficial: The chart shows that some protein foods cause greater release of insulin than some carbohydrate foods. Steamed fish, for example, causes more insulin to go into your circulation than potato chips. You will also notice that combining fat and carbohydrate into chocolate chip cookies, for instance, greatly increases insulin release and greatly increases the storage of body fat.

How you can lower the insulin index: There are two ways you can keep the insulin index down. One is to consume a kind of fiber called beta-glucan. This is the fiber found in oat bran. Anytime you eat the fiber in oat bran, your pancreas releases less insulin. Less fat will be stored.

The other way is simply to avoid combining carbohydrate and fat. Blood sugars are actually lowered when you combine carbohydrate and fat, but fat storage is increased. If you choose to eat something sugary, and that’s something diabetics should do rarely, you need to make sure it’s low-fat. It’s OK to combine protein and fat, or to combine protein and carbohydrate, but you should never combine carbohydrate and fat. The combination of carbohydrate and fat in food stimulates the release of insulin to store fat in fat cells.

Does dieting by the insulin index really work? A test of the Insulin Index Diet in Mexico found that eating reduced portions of lower insulin index foods resulted in about 21 pounds (9.4 kg) of weight loss in six weeks. Eating reduced portions of higher insulin index foods resulted in about 16 pounds (7.2 kg) of weight loss over the same period. That’s five extra pounds in six weeks of dieting.

It’s hard for diabetics to lose weight, and every helpful change in diet counts. Combining foods in the right way and avoiding foods that give your pancreas a workout is a start toward meaningful weight loss.

I’m a New Diabetic … What About Fruit?

I’m a New Diabetic … What About Fruit?
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 14-12-2009

Today’s article comes in the form of a question from one of my readers.

“Hello. Thanks for all the great work you’ve been doing to educate us on diabetes. It’s wonderful and I have learned a lot!

My question is about fruit. Now I have been so diligent about removing all the sugar and processed foods from my diet for the past month. There’s not a single cookie, candy bar, Coca Cola, or ice cream bar in the house. And the funny thing is that with all these gone, I don’t even miss them. Not one ioda.

Well, occasionally I still feel that I would like something a little sweet. So I grab an apple or an orange during the day. But lately, I want sweeter fruits. I got a little off track when I was making grape and apricot jam from the fruits off my trees in the backyard. They tasted so good I forgot all about my diet and helped myself. It was like a gorging session.

My question is this: since fruit is natural – you can’t get more natural than picking it off my trees, then is this okay on a diabetic diet?” … Mary

ANSWER:

Dear Mary,

Fruit grown naturally is the way it is supposed to be grown and these fruits are always good foods for a diabetic. But fruit is a carbohydrate food and when you are diabetic, type 1 or type 2, you have to limit the carbohydrates. You can only have 4 or 5 servings a day, and never more than one serving at a time.

Fruit contains the naturally occurring sugar fructose. Years ago, we thought that fructose didn’t cause any problems with blood sugar and was perfectly fine for diabetics. Fructose is metabolized differently than sucrose or glucose.

But the problem is that the fructose can act almost like a free radical in the body. It is a precursor to a compound called AGE’s, which are free radicals with extra special super power to damage cells, organs and tissues. When AGE’s accumulate in your body, they rapidly age you, cause tangled protein masses that are dysfunctional in your brain and damage every possible protein they meet. Now we know that the natural sugar fructose can contribute to causing complications in diabetics.

So your best solution is to keep making the jam, sugarless of course, and don’t pick the fruit unless you have already eaten a meal and aren’t hungry! Stay with the recommendation of only one serving of fruit at any one time and you will be fine.