Tag Archives: blood sugar level

WHY SHOULD I REMOVE HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP FROM MY DIET?

WHY SHOULD I REMOVE HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP FROM MY DIET?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 21-10-2015

Closeup of ingredients list of granola health bar with forms of sugar highlighted...

Closeup of ingredients list of granola health bar with forms of sugar highlighted…

“Bad things” happen when you include high fructose corn syrup in your diet.

In one study, healthy individuals consumed either glucose or fructose-sweetened drinks. The drinks were made up of either 25% of the calories from glucose or 25% of the calories from fructose. They consumed the sweetened drinks for 10 weeks.
The group that consumed the fructose had…

– developed insulin resistance,
– their abdominal fat increased,
– their blood sugar level, and
– insulin levels increased.

In various other studies, there is an increase in gout episodes, even in those who never had gout before. This is a frightening thought because it means thousands of children will end up with gout – and gout is a very painful disease to have….

– imagine how hard it would be to watch your child suffer from gout for a few weeks at a time,
– how difficult it would be to have to give your child medications for gout that are toxic in many ways, and
– how much time it will take out of your regular schedule to have to attend to this new health issue.

Children already have developed gout from eating a lot of foods with high fructose corn syrup. This isn’t a theory that hasn’t been proven. It’s reality.

High fructose is a killer. That’s the bottom line. Do you really want it in your diet or your family’s diet?

In the next article, find out whether or not sugar is addictive and what’s the evidence about it?

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

IT’S DIABETIC QUIZ TIME… HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HOW DIABETES AFFECTS YOUR BODY?

IT’S DIABETIC QUIZ TIME… HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HOW DIABETES AFFECTS YOUR BODY?
Posted by Beverleigh H Piepers RN, Dated 1-7-2015

Understanding how diabetes affects your body gives you a strong foundation for making smart decisions about your health. Test yourself with these quiz questions…

High blood sugar levels affects nerves, kidneys, eyes, blood vessels, heart and skin...

High blood sugar levels affects nerves, kidneys, eyes, blood vessels, heart and skin…

1. Diabetes is a disorder of protein metabolism. This is why diabetics lose muscle mass as they get older. True or False?

 2. The reason why diabetics can develop cataracts is because their blood fats are high and form a cloud of fat over the lens of the eyes. True or False?

3. Heating foods to high temperatures is okay for diabetics. True or False?

4. Heating foods in a microwave is perfectly fine for diabetics. True or False?

5. Eating foods that are fried speeds up oxidation in your body, which generates free radicals in high amounts. True or False?

6. One reason why Type 2 diabetics get neuropathy is because of the drug Metformin. True or False?

7. One reason why diabetics get neuropathy is because the nerves “dry up.” True or False?

8. Diabetics can use diet to control their blood sugar and bring it down at least 20 mg/dL (1.1 mmol/L) for fasting levels. True or False?

9. Diabetes affects the heart and blood vessels. True or False?

ANSWERS…

1. False. Type 2 diabetes is a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism. Carbohydrates are not broken down properly in the body when there’s diabetes. The blood sugar from the carbohydrate breakdown remains in the blood instead of going into the muscles. Your mission as a Type 2 diabetic is to lower your blood sugar and gain insulin sensitivity.
2. False. The cataracts are created from high levels of blood sugar. Protein foods may also be given a Glycemic Index.
3. False. Heating foods to high temperatures creates high amounts of advanced glycation end products, which bring on more diabetes complications and additional degenerative diseases such as high blood pressure. Protein foods may also be given a Glycemic Index.
4. False. Heating foods in a microwave superheats foods and causes advanced glycation end products.
5. True. Free radicals damage the body and bring on more complications of diabetes.
6. True. Metformin has been found to cause a vitamin B12 deficiency which causes peripheral neuropathy.
7. True. Nerves start out in a bundle and then divide into smaller and smaller nerves. The smallest nerves begin to wither up in diabetes until they do not exist. Protein foods may also be given a Glycemic Index.
8. True.
9. True.

 

Beverleigh H Piepers RN
Type 2 Diabetes Health Coach

Facebook: DrugFreeType2Diabetes
Twitter: @diabetes2diva

 

 

 

Where to Start When Trying to Self-manage Type diabetes 2?

Where to Start When Trying to Self-manage Type diabetes 2?
Posted by admin, Dated 14-10-2013

HOW TO IDENTIFY THE FOODS THAT CAUSE YOUR DRAMATIC BLOOD SUGAR SPIKES

Self-management of your Type 2 diabetes can seem like a really daunting task.But I would like to add it is a very rewarding task for all who do it correctly, namely blood sugar levels dropping regularly and reducing the need for medication or insulin. Hopefully, this article can give you some pointers of where to get started because whether you have had Type 2 diabetes for years, or have recently been diagnosed – just know you do not have to live with it, nor does it have to be a death sentence.

According to the WHO (Worldwide Health Organisation), 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Plus, in 2004, an estimated 3.4 million people died from consequences of high fasting blood sugar levels. These numbers are just too serious to ignore. What this means is the general conventional treatment plan used across the board to treat Type 2 diabetes needs to change, and fast. After all, Type 2 diabetes is a modern day lifestyle disease that largely comes about from making the wrong food choices on an individual basis, combined with a lack of exercise. For some, drinking alcohol and smoking on a regular basis can be other negative lifestyle factors that can contribute to triggering the disease.

So, if a person’s ‘lifestyle and diet’ is the main cause behind triggering Type 2 diabetes – it seems logical this should be where we look to apply treatment first.

How do I go about starting to self-manage my Type 2 diabetes?

A crucial place to start when looking to treat diabetes yourself is to document the effect all the food you eat has on your blood sugar, and to find out which ones cause a large rise to your blood sugar. Remember, all food will cause your blood sugar levels to rise somewhat as this is how we raise our energy levels so we don’t feel flat line all the time. What you specifically need to look out for though, are sudden large rises in your blood sugar levels.

The simplest way to do this is to make three food lists:

List 1 – Food you eat every single day
List 2 – Food you eat every second and third day
List 3 – Foods only eaten once a week or less

bhp.Diabetes.bsl.Then choose one of the foods you eat every day (let’s call it ‘white rice’), and avoid it completely for five days. On the sixth day, take a blood-sugar measurement in the usual way (i.e. with a finger stick test strip or an electronic device that measures blood sugar levels from a tiny drop of blood) before breakfast. Then eat the ‘white rice’ on its own entirely for breakfast. About one hour later, you will need to take another blood sugar measurement. Document all results as you go along.

Carry out this simple technique until you have tested every single food item, on every single test. What you will have formed by the end of it is a fourth list that tells you all of the foods that tested positive to causing a huge spike in your blood sugar levels. The only time you should not carry out testing on foods is if your blood sugar measures as already high before breakfast. Simply carry on testing when it has lowered before breakfast.

This is now your most vital list and you should incorporate it into your everyday life by avoiding the foods on this list. Still ensuring though

Pre-Diabetes Question: How often do I have to go to the doctor? I plan on my next visit to see my heart doctor in two months.

Pre-Diabetes Question: How often do I have to go to the doctor? I plan on my next visit to see my heart doctor in two months.
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 4-7-2013

When you have pre-diabetes, your most important health professionals are your primary care physician, your dietitian or nutritionist, and your doctor if you have a special problem (such as a cardiologist if you already have a heart issue).

After your diagnosis of pre-diabetes, your primary care physician will give you about 3 months to gain control of your blood sugar level. He wants to see you successful in this endeavor. He really doesn’t want to see another person get to the point where they have diabetes and need medication.

Your doctor knows that once you get a diagnosis of diabetes, it’s going to be downhill – that’s what happens to all his patients.

After your primary care physician appointment with the diagnosis of pre-diabetes, make the appointment for your nutritionist as soon as you can. The extra three weeks can really offer a lot of time for the dietary changes you’ll need to make. By waiting an extra month, you’re moving up rapidly towards the date of your primary care physician appointment at three months where he’ll recheck your blood sugar. If it’s still high, you’ll be given medication whether you like it or not.

The three months also gives you time to lose weight because if you can lose 10% of your body weight, you can bring your blood sugar and blood pressure down at least 10-20 points and into the normal zone, respectively.

Imagine how good it will be to return at three months to find out you’re not pre-diabetic AND you don’t need as much blood pressure medication anymore.

Setting Goals is Everything for Diabetics!

Setting Goals is Everything for Diabetics!
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 22-4-2011

We don’t have to wait until the end of the year to make resolutions of what we will accomplish in the future. We can create goals on a monthly basis. You can say to yourself, “On the first day of the month of January I will take action to solve xyz problem. I will proceed in this fashion…”

On the first day of February you can set a new or revised goal. By the end of the year, you will have solved 10 different problems that would have not been addressed otherwise. And at the end of the year, you’ve come a long way and made progress. The progress makes you feel as if you have control over your life. Your personality starts to show more confidence in the area of health when you set health goals. And you start to look and feel better.

The difference between those who are highly successful and those who are not lies in the development of habits that include goal setting and searching for knowledge and the truth.

Those who are successful strategise their success on multiple levels. What they will accomplish for the next year depends on what they will accomplish each month of the year. What they accomplish each month of the year will be dependent on what they accomplish each week of the month. What they accomplish each week of the month is dependent on what is accomplished daily.

To successful people, a day without goals is a day wasted in life. They live by the motto, “DO SOMETHING!”

Success-oriented people often sit down and write a goals map for the year. They write more goals than they can ever possibly accomplish. Why? Because many goals are interrelated. When you hit the goal of lowering your blood sugar level to 100mg/dL (5.5mmol/L) on fasting, guess what happens? You have started the reversal of peripheral neuropathy, kidney disease, aging, and other disease processes in the body. All these become benefits of hitting one goal.

After writing as many goals as you can think of for the year, it’s time to then decide which ones will take the longest and which ones will be first. You must prioritize them.

Well, Your Health Care Practitioner May Not Prescribe Insulin For You!

Well, Your Health Care Practitioner May Not Prescribe Insulin For You!
Posted by Beverleigh Piepers RN, Dated 16-3-2010

When someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, one of the telltale signs is a high fasting blood sugar level. The normal levels are 70 to 110 mg dL (3.9 to 6 mmol/L) or 80 to 120 mg/dL (4.4 to 6.6 mmol/L) depending on the clinical laboratory.

Diabetes medication is not always prescribed for type 2 diabetics. Your medical doctor will decide this based on your case. The higher your fasting blood level, the greater the chance that you will be given prescription medication.

The type of medication that is given to a type 1 diabetic is different than that given to a type 2 diabetic. That’s because the person diagnosed with type 1 diabetes cannot create the quantity of insulin he or she needs … whereas a type 2 diabetic is pumping out more than enough! As a type 2 diabetic, you would never be able to share medication with a a person with type 1 diabetes. Of course, sharing medication is against the law anyway!

Usually type 2 diabetics are given oral medications that are in the category called biguanides. One example of a biguanide is Metformin. These drugs lower blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose produced by your liver. They also increase the amount of insulin that the muscles in your body recognize as insulin and then use. Metformin is one of the most prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes.

Some health care providers will prescribe medications that stimulate the beta cells of your pancreas to release more insulin. Drugs that are used to do this fall into the category of sulfonylureas and meglitinides. The physician determines whether or not you will need these drugs by examining your insulin levels. It’s possible that your pancreas has been overworked so hard that it’s cells are not capable of producing enough insulin, and if that is the case, that is when he’ll prescribe these medications.

Type 1 diabetics need insulin itself which is delivered via injection or an insulin pump.

Your health care practitioner may decide to wait on prescribing medications for you. By doing so, he will tell you to lose weight, start an exercise plan, and watch your diet for a few months. If your blood sugar level is still high after those three months, he will most likely intervene and prescribe the medications.